All posts by Lawrence Yule

Research Assistant in Acoustics, Solent Acoustics, Southampton Solent University.

GUITAR SOUNDBOARD MEASUREMENTS FOR REPEATABLE ACOUSTIC PERFORMANCE MANUFACTURING

The following post gives a brief summary of a research paper submitted to Reproduced Sound 2018 primarily written by Ludovico Ausiello, with contributions from Lawrence Yule, Giacomo Squicciarini, and Chris Barlow.

A system for performing fast, accurate and objective assessment of the time-frequency response of guitar soundboards has been developed, using an application of the sine-sweep method commonly used to retrieve impulse responses of acoustic spaces or electro-acoustic devices.

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Spatial Audio At Solent

Welcome to RM707, our newly configured spatial audio lab! The loudspeaker installation here allows us to pan sounds around in full surround sound, using a system known as ambisonics. One of the major drawbacks to traditional surround sound formats (5.1, 7.1 etc.) is that they’re channel based, meaning that the loudspeakers have to orientated in a particular way (to ITU spec), and when mixing audio around there are a very limited number of positions to work with. Ambisonics allows us to decode audio to any loudspeaker configuration, including loudspeakers positioned at different heights, as well as being able to pan sounds to positions in space rather than just to particular channels.

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Plotting Audio Data With R & Plotly

Disclaimer: This guide is written for Windows users however all tools are also available for Mac and Linux.

Presenting data in an aesthetically pleasing way can be difficult, there are many different tools available for creating graphs and plots but many of the best are challenging to learn, expensive, or both. This post will show you a way of using the free R programming language along with the graphing service Plotly to create high quality plots, specifically when dealing with audio data. 

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The Acoustics of Sonic Booms

Sonic booms are something that most people will have heard at some point in their lives, perhaps from planes passing by at an airshow, or from a bull whip (yes, the tip travels faster than the speed of sound!), but what exactly are they? and how do they produce such an incredible noise? This posts explores the acoustics of sonic booms.

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Natural Hearing Protection: Hands?

Have you ever covered your ears with your hands to protect yourself from loud noise? That’s the closest to natural hearing protection that we’ve got, but just how much does it reduce the sound pressure level reaching your ear? And what’s the best method? This experiment aims to find out.

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Tutorial: Measuring Reverberation Time – Part 2 – Deconvolution

In our previous reverberation time measurement tutorial an impulse response, created by bursting a balloon, was used as the measurement signal. This is a quick and simple method of carrying out a reverberation time measurement, but may not be the most accurate method. In this tutorial we will look at an alternative method that can provide improved results.

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